Link to MyFrugal Life Home Page My Frugal Life Blogs My Frugal Life Feedback My Frugal Life Photos My Frugal Life Posts My Frugal Life Blogs My Frugal Life Blogs
 User Login:  Username:    Password:      Forgot It? | Register
Blog: My Little Farm in Town

On Self-Sufficiency: Hubbard vs. Hayes

Sunday, December 05, 2010

One of my hobbies is reading autobiographies, journals, and handbooks on thrift and “self-sufficiency.” I was reading Payne Hollow Journal by Harlan Hubbard last night and something about the guy bothered me.  He wrote about all the various tasks of “simple living” in tune with the seasons and the land: gathering and chopping wood, gardening and gleaning, animal husbandry, and painting and observing nature, with some musical evenings and infrequent trips to town for minor shopping and cultural events. Sounds nice doesn’t it?

He also related how he was really out of sorts before and after a visit of any length to another’s home or anyone’s visit to his home. He mused on how he was able to act cordial until the second either he or they were out the door and then he was back to his previous grumpy mood.

I couldn’t pinpoint what was bothering me—depressing me really—about Hubbard’s worldview. That was until I started reading Radical Homemakers by Shannon Hayes. To paraphrase her description of a Radical Homemaker, all “radical homemakers” were able to do a lot of things that enabled them to live on one income and save money by not needing it, but none of them could, or tried, to do everything.

Although Mr. Hubbard’s prose was wonderful, his outlook was too self-sufficient. He observed the natural world as interconnected, but he was emotionally disconnected from the greater world around him, which included people (with the exception of his wife) and just about anything that happened in town!  The key things that the Radical Homemakers had in common, besides all being great cooks, were their ability to connect with each other. They were interdependent. They all valued and nurtured community and relationships. They helped each other and learned from each other, and it made their lives richer and more satisfying.  

Last year, a friend of mine found a good deal on beef, and we bought a side of beef together. This week, my neighbor gave me two shopping bags of vegetables she didn’t want from her winter vegetable share from a local CSA.  Last night, I made a big pot of beef vegetable soup for my family. That pot of soup that fed my family was really a group effort with two other families!

Are you doing everything you know how to be thrifty and self-sufficient and still not succeeding? Perhaps you are failing because you are trying to do too much alone! Begonia 

2 Comments | Post Feedback

Feedback:

love this!
Thursday, December 09, 2010 | By MzScarlett

making mixes ahead of time; and cooking and making enough to feed for a month; I used to do with a friend and neighbor as we both worked. We would shop, and then once or twice a month would get together and spend the day making the mixes; and then cooking, cooling, wrapping and freezing so that it was all ready to simply take out of the freezer! We had great fun together getting it done; and it was enjoyable and rewarding not to mention saving a great deal of stress and money in our lives to have it ready and done for us!
Many people are unaware of how to do it; how rewarding it would be if they trained this in the schools!


You are so kind MzScarlett
Thursday, December 09, 2010 | By begonia

What a wonderful example of working together and having fun! I used to can applesauce with a dear friend and we always had a good time.

My New Year's resolution is to put more meals in the freezer and plan my meals so that I am shopping only twice a month--apart from bananas and dairy products. I want to cut down on trips to the grocery store and save money by not eating out or making special trips to the store here in town for anything but super sale items! We'll see how it goes!


Post Feedback:

You need to be a registered ThriftyFun user post feedback. If you are registered, login using the form at the top of this page. Click here to register.

Author:
begonia (Contact)
Wisconsin USA
Navigation:
Blog Home
RSS Feed
Photo Album

Categories:

Better Living
Books
Budget and Finance
Christmas
Craft Projects
Emergency
Entertainment
Food Tips and Info
Freebies
Garage Sales
Gardening
Gifts
Green Living
Home Improvement
Make Your Own
Organizing
Pets
Recipes
Recreation

Archive:

July 2012
April 2012
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
© 2019 MyFrugalLife.com - A ThriftyFun.com website!
Disclaimer: MyFrugalLife.com cannot accept any responsibility for any injury or damage that you may cause to yourself, others, or property when following any advice given on this site. MyFrugalLife.com has no control of how you may use information you get from this site and does not attest to the validity of any information found within. Much of this information comes from third parties (newsletter readers and other contributers). Use advice found in our newsletters and on our site with common sense and at your own risk. If you see something in our newsletters or on our site that you disagree with, please let us know. Our goal is print only valuable information and advice. If you find any information on MyFrugalLife.com or in our newsletters that is either erroneous and/or potentially harmful to others, please Contact Us, immediately.